As The Sun Goes Down

As the sun goes down the work begins. It is a nightly routine I have gotten used to over the last six years since coming to Cyprus.
As The Sun Goes Down. Ray C Doyle

As the sun goes down the work begins. It is a nightly routine I have gotten used to over the last six years since coming to Cyprus. I finish dinner each evening and wait. A glorious sight transforms the evening sky into a changing colourful painting as the sun goes down across the Mediterranean. 

In a short space of time, I am looking at a different scene, maybe of violence or a car chase. These scenes are not for real but are real enough in my mind’s eye for me to record them as part of the story I am working on. 

At the moment I am working on the second book of my mystery thriller trilogy. I have axed three chapters that should have been written much better. So as the sun goes down I work on changing the way two fugitives react to changes in their escape plans. For them, there is no cool evening as the sun goes down but a hot and tension-filled day as they use all their wits and inventiveness to evade capture.

Research is something that paints a real-life picture for the reader. In order to make a reader feel the tension or the danger surrounding our heroes, one has to research everything that brings the chapter you are working on to what I call an active life. A bus is taking them somewhere in London. What number bus and what route does it take and does it go down the road they want to get to? What trees are lining the road? What’s the fare?

Hundreds of details have to be researched and then interwoven into the chapter to bring authenticity and excitement to the reader. The first chapter in this my second book is only two pages long and yet, as it was full of detail without boring the reader, I spent two weeks going through a pile of books to make the details as correct as possible.

The early hours are my time of the day. I have an affinity with the night and work best in the peace and quiet as my characters chase each other in fast cars or get involved in murder or political corruption. It’s a strange juxtaposition, yet unlike a movie, one can turn on and off, the scene in the writer’s head carries on after the writing has stopped. Such is the intensity of being involved in creating and enacting the plot, that it takes time to slow down and fade the action before sleep overtakes us.

I love writing and will continue to create until the sun goes down for the last time.